Elisabeth Harrison

News Director

Elisabeth Harrison's journalism background includes everything from behind-the-scenes work with the CBS Evening News to freelance documentary production.

She joined the WRNI team in 2007 as a Morning Edition producer and freelance journalist. In 2009, she became a full-time reporter, and became the Morning Edition host in 2011.  She was promoted to full-time News Director in June of 2015.

Harrison's education is as wide ranging as her work at Rhode Island Public Radio. She has a B.A. in English and French from Wellesley College, and a joint M.A. in Journalism and French Studies from NYU.

A native of Los Angeles, Harrison loves good food and good movies.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of the PawSox

A Pawtucket property owner is urging city leaders to include downtown improvement in the plan to build a new stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox.

Courtesy of the PawSox

PawSox officials unveiled a vision for a downtown Pawtucket ballpark on Friday, created by Yale architecture students, who spent part of a semester working on the project.

RIPR file photo

A new casino on Rhode Island's border with Massachusetts will open later than expected and cost nearly twice its projected price tag, Twin River said Wednesday.

The facility, already under construction in Tiverton, was designed to house 1,000 slot machines and provide gamblers access to nearly three dozen table games. Twin River also operates a casino in Lincoln.

RIPR File Photo

It’s breeding time for deer, and that means an increased likelihood of car crashes.  Mating time means more deer on the move -- crossing roads and highways.

National Grid

National Grid reports only about 300 customers remain without power as of Friday night. The bulk of the remaining customers are in Providence County. 

According to the latest utility estimates, power should be restored around 12:15 a.m. Saturday. 

More Than 1,500 People Remain Without Power In RI

Despite what National Grid described as round-the-clock efforts, more than 1,500 customers are going into day five with no power, following Sunday’s storm with hurricane strength winds. 

The damage caused by the storm is some of the most disruptive in recent history, according to the utility's website

John Bender

"It sounded like a war zone." That's how Warwick resident Adam Logan described the storm that knocked out power to his home and more than 140,000 others across Rhode Island.

Lynn Arditi

In the town of Barrington, nearly all National Grid customers were without power Monday morning, some 5,377 households and businesses, according to the utility's website.

John Bender / RIPR

In Warwick, the Rhode Island city with the largest number of customers who lost power, nearly 14,000 homes and businesses remained in the dark Monday evening. Residents and work crews spent much of the day cleaning up debris and waiting for the power to come back.

GateHouse Media Inc. snatched up another Southern New England newspaper this week with its purchase of the Newport Daily News. This adds to more than 100 publications in GateHouse's portfolio, including The Providence Journal, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette, The Fall River Herald and The New Bedford Standard Times.


Lynn Arditi

Memorial Hospital is closing all but some walk-in clinics after its planned sale to a California hospital chain fell through.

Hospital officials announced the decision on Tuesday at a noon meeting with hundreds of employees.

Sofia Rudin / RIPR

Cape Cod and the surrounding islands are forecast to get some of the worst wind and rain from Jose, although the storm is tracking further east than earlier predictions had indicated. In Falmouth, some residents were stocking up on water, gas and food Tuesday, ahead of the storm.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, joins Bonus Q&A to discuss reshaping the state’s workforce, increasing college completion rates, and what colleges need from K-12 schools. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, joins Political Roundtable to discuss a jump in the school’s enrollment this year, the federal rollback of protections for some young undocumented immigrants and more. 

Elisabeth Harrison

The announcement that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, will be phased out came the same day that many colleges and universities began a new school year. Dozens of New England students had sought protection under the program, which granted temporary reprieves to young people without documentation, if they were brought into the U.S. as children.

Courtesy Brian Glyn Williams

It’s back to school season, a time when many students are asked, "What did you do over the summer?" Well, one professor at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth has an intriguing answer to that question.

History professor Brian Glyn Williams traveled to Iraq, where he helped rescue a young girl from ISIS.

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