Ready Or Not

New England has already started experiencing the effects of climate change: sea levels are rising, water temperatures are warming and major storms are becoming stronger. But are Rhode Island and the South Coast prepared for the consequences of these changes?

 

Avory Brookins, Rhode Island Public Radio's Environment Reporter, investigates that question to find out if we're "ready or not." Throughout this series, she'll reveal who and what are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and what more needs to be done to prepare.

 

 

Juan Rodriguez

On a quiet street by Green Hill Pond in Charlestown about a mile away from the ocean, Andrew Baer walks onto his front lawn and asks for help sliding the cap off his well. Luckily, he's having solar panels installed and there are plenty of hands at-the-ready. 

Avory Brookins / RIPR

This year, during an annual environment lecture series at the University of Rhode Island, almost all of the talks focused on the present and future impacts of climate change.

For the next installment of our series “Ready or Not,” Environment Reporter Avory Brookins sits down with speaker Amy Snover from the University of Washington. 

Avory Brookins / RIPR

From the rocks at the ocean's edge on Roy Carpenter's Beach, it's just a short walk up to the cottages. 

"There’s 21 houses total, 11 in this row and 10 in this row," Landowner Robert Thoresen said as he headed toward the first two rows on the left side of the property. 

The cottages in these rows are in a prime oceanfront location, but they won't be here for long. 

Juan Rodriguez

Eileen Sheehan lives only about a couple hundred feet away from the Westport River. Through the windows in her living room, you can see light from the sun twinkling off the water. 

However, Sheehan said these days, it's depressing to look out into the river because of what's been happening to the salt marsh islands.