artscape

Preservation Society of Newport County

A young Oscar Wilde came to Newport in 1882, on a U.S. tour promoting "Aestheticism," or art for art’s sake. For this month’s Artscape, we visit Rosecliff Mansion, where an exhibit commemorates that visit. It’s called “Bohemian Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement and Oscar Wilde’s Newport.” 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

In the 1920s, 30s and 40s, radio was the dominant electronic medium for home entertainment, with much of that entertainment being performed live and broadcast over the airwaves. A monthly performance at the Columbus Theatre draws inspirationg from this tradition.

Jane Pickens Theater

The American director James Ivory has been a filmmaking success story for more than 30 years, mostly with his company Merchant/Ivory Productions. Now 89, he's still going strong.

Lily Hinman / RIPR

In October last year, RIPR's Chuck Hinman joined a group of adults learning to play stringed instruments for the first time, with the Community String Project in Bristol. Hinman has been chronicling his musical journey in our series “Striking a New Chord”. 

Guild Historical

In the summer of 1934, George Gershwin was staying in a cottage on Folly Island, South Carolina, working on his folk opera "Porgy and Bess." 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

In part 2 of our series, "Striking a New Chord: A 15-Week Journey To Learning An Instrument," RIPR’s Morning Host Chuck Hinman continues to follow a group of adults learning to play string instruments for the first time.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

November marks the one-year anniversary for Rhode Island's poet laureate, Tina Cane. 

Cane is a teacher as well as a published poet, and for this month’s Artscape, she joined RIPR’s Chuck Hinman to talk about poetry, and her mission to inject more of it into ordinary life. She’s already placed poetry on the public bus system statewide.    

RIPR

In this multi-part series, "Striking a New Chord: A 15-Week Journey To Learning An Instrument," RIPR’s Morning Edition host Chuck Hinman follows a beginning adult ensemble class for violin, viola, cello and bass in Bristol, RI.


Chuck Hinman

Earlier this month, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan. While not quite as shocking as when Dylan went electric at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, the award still caused some controversy among those critics who felt it was artistically unjustified. They said the singer-songwriter known for such influential songs as “Blowing in the Wind” and “Like a Rolling Stone” was not creating literature.

For this month’s Artscape, RIPR’s Chuck Hinman gets some perspective on the award from Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, who also teaches a seminar on Dylan.


Yale Art Gallery

For November's Artscape, we visited New Haven, Connecticut, where an exhibit at the Yale University Art Gallery showcases the dramatic artistry of furniture making in colonial-era Rhode Island. Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman talked with the gallery's Curator of American Decorative Arts, Patricia Kane, about Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830.

Manton Avenue Project

Live theater is thriving in Rhode Island, and one program may inspire a new generation of playwrights. The Manton Avenue Project has kids write the plays and adult actors bring them to life. Rhode Island Public Radio intern Tarpley Hitt went to a performance to check it out.  

On a Saturday evening, kids race around a small stage in Roger Williams Memorial Park, fighting for the best patch of grass. Parents lean back on beach chairs as two performers enter with microphones.

On Rhode Island Public Radio's Artscape this month we look at podcasting, with a profile of Nate Dimeo, a podcaster based in Los Angeles, but with deep Rhode Island roots.

Chuck Hinman

The Jamestown Arts Center exhibit "Setting the Stage” presents a behind-the-scenes look at two celebrated designers: Set Designer Eugene Lee and Interior Designer Kyla Coburn.

Lee and Coburn were recently inducted into the RI Design Hall of Fame; Coburn was named Emerging Designer for her work at some of Rhode Island’s hippest restaurants and bars, and Lee received Lifetime Achievement recognition for his award-winning sets on Broadway, and his work for television and Trinity Rep.

Dead Animals: Taxidermy in Art

Mar 10, 2016
Chuck Hinman

Have you given any thought lately to your relationship with animals? Statistics reveal a contradictory interaction between humans and other species.

Here in the United States, the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that there could be as many as 176 million dogs and cats being kept as pets, many of them no doubt treated as beloved members of the family. On the other hand, figures from the Humane Society show billions of cattle, chickens and other livestock slaughtered every year for food.

Photo by Julieta Cervantes

For serious jazz fans, A Love Supreme, by saxophonist John Coltrane needs no introduction.  A Love Supreme was recorded in one day at the end of 1964, and released 51 years ago this month, in February of 1965. It’s since been recognized as one of the all-time great jazz masterworks.

On Saturday, Urban Bush Women, a group of African American dancers out of Brooklyn, bring their unique interpretation of Coltrane’s achievement to the Vets, in Providence. For this month’s Rhode Island Artscape, RIPR's Chuck Hinman reports on the psychology of Coltrane and jazz improvisation.

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