dan mckee

Most of the media coverage of last week’s Rhode Island primaries focused on the statewide contests for governor and lieutenant governor. But RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says if you are seeking clues to change, look at General Assembly and city council contests.

Avory Brookins / RIPR

The power of progressive Democrats faces a local test Wednesday. In the Rhode Island primary, a group of progressives are challenging candidates backed by the party establishment.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island candidates stepped up their final push for voters' support ahead of the Wednesday primary with a combination of high-profile endorsemens and retail politics.

In the race for lieutenant governor between incumbent Democrat Dan McKee and progressive challenger Aaron Regunberg, Regunberg received an endorsement from 2016 presidential candidate and U.S. Sen. from Vermont Bernie Sanders.

John Bender / RIPR

Six mayors from Northern Rhode Island gathered Tuesday in a show of support for Lt. Governor Dan McKee. He’s facing a primary challenge next week from Providence State Representative Aaron Regunberg.

McKee served for six terms as Mayor of Cumberland and said that experience informed his priorities as Lieutenant Governor. Standing on the Statehouse steps, he said he has the connections with municipal leaders and the practical experience to keep doing the job.

We're getting down to the wire, with less than two weeks until Rhode Island's September 12 primary election. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo

Rhode Island Public Radio present a special primary debate in Rhode Island’s Democratic race for lieutenant governor.

Summer is fading, the kids are headed back to school and the political campaign season is getting serious. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay looks at the biggest upcoming Rhode Island statewide primary contests. 


The end of an era is dawning, with plans by the PawSox to move to Worcester -- a story that will continue to reverberate in Rhode Island. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. (Program note: I'm taking next week off, so TGIF will return August 31.)

August is here, signaling the run-up to the September primary. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Summer is here, the General Assembly has adjourned and the political news keeps coming fast and furious. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

RI Commerce Corporation

Businessman Karl Wadensten is making a run for lieutenant governor in Rhode Island.

Wadensten, 58, serves on the board of the state’s economic development agency, now known as the Commerce Corporation, where he was the only board member to oppose the deal for the 38 Studios video game company in 2010.

Wadensten, who is running as a Republican, said he sees running for public office as a logical next step after serving on state boards.

Just when you think the PawSox stadium might be down for the count this legislative session, a new proposal emerges on the scene. 

It's Memorial Day weekend, a time to reflect on the sacrifices of others while also looking to summer pleasures. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can reach me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Only about two months remain until the filing deadline to run for public office in Rhode Island this year, so a more active phase of campaign season is approaching. With that in mind, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Elisabeth Harrison

Providence County is participating in a trial run of the 2020 U.S. Census. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay traces how something that shouldn’t provoke controversy has become partisan.

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